Morning Glory - Ipomoea - Outdoor Plants | Plantshop.me

Beach Morning Glory

ipomoea pes-caprae

SKU 3859

HURRY! LIMITED QTY

AED 39

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60cm - 80cm

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Default Plastic Pot

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Plant Care

Watering

During summer, Water daily or when the soil starts to become slightly dry at the top. During Winter season water once in 2 days or when the soil starts to become slightly dry at the top. Keep the soil lightly moist at all times, but do not overwater as this will cause brown spots and leaf drop. Curly or dry leaves suggest, the plant is dry and needs watering. Water in the early morning or late evening when temperatures are cooler. Always check your soil before watering.

Light

During summer season keep the plants in shaded area and during winter season plants can withstand direct/indirect light.

Temperature

During summer season or when the temperature is above 45°C place the plant in shaded area. During winter season or the when the temperature is below 45°C the plants can be directly placed in direct/indirect sunlight.

Fertilizer

Apply liquid fertilizer or slow release fertilizer once in 15 days. Always fertilizer the plants during the morning hours when the temperature is low. For best results use Folikraft ready to use Outdoor Plant Food / Flower Booster.

Plant Bio

THIS SALT TOLERANT VINE WILL FLOURISH ALONG BEACHES

You’ll find the salt tolerant Railroad Vine flourishing along beaches, where it works to stabilize the dunes. Considered a perennial, the flowering vine can grow up to several feet in length with small nodes located along its long stems. Its name comes from the Latin for “goat foot” – which the leaves resemble. The flowers have dark centers that fade into pale pink petals. They are at the height of their beauty in the morning, which is why some consider the vine a “morning glory.”

The Railroad Vine has a wide range of herbal remedy uses: in Australia, people use the plant in a poultice for sting ray stings; in Brazil it’s used for treating inflammation; and in the Philippines, it’s used for colic, whitlow, piles and rheumatism.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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